Antiquing a Great Leisure Actvity for Baby Boomers

           Published June 29, 2012           

           When furnishing your home, some might be drawn to Scandinavian design at IKEA Stores.  Personal taste and a love for traditional design furniture might bring others to Ethen Allen. For all those who like the more contemporary look, the Martha Stewart Furniture Collection may simply be their cup of tea.

            However, for Baby Boomers, Scott and Rae Davis, owners ofRhode Island’s largest antique mall, antiques are the way to go when furnishing your home. From college students, to young families, baby boomers, to even the retired, buying antiques can be a perfect solution to decorating your residence. 

            At age 50, Scott Davis, was an antique hobbyist for half of his life before he opened up Rhode Island Antique Mall inPawtucket.  His love for antiques is apparent. When asked, he quickly tells you that “Antiques make a house a home with their warmth, character and charm.”  More important, thePawtucketbusinessman will tell you that antiques will hold their value or appreciate compared to new furnishings that begin losing value immediately upon purchase. 

            Antiquing can provide you with hours of entertainment.  Especially, in winter time and rainy days, antique hunting can be a relaxing and enjoyable way to pass time without experiencing high pressure salesman or encountering large crowds while shopping at malls or large furniture stores,Davissays.   

            Today’s furniture is not built to last for a lifetime, Scott says.  “Antiques were crafted to last generations unlike today’s foreign imported products, carelessly made from particle board and drywall screws.”  Antiques almost always become family heirlooms, he says, “new items rarely do,” he observes.   

“Antiques impart a pride of ownership that is rarely equaled by new items, especially those imported from Asia,Davissays. 

           Davisrattles off a long list of other reasons to this writer, for people to consider antiquing as the way to go to when decorating your house.  “Antiques teach us about history and preserve our heritage.  They are also ‘Green’ and help preserve our natural resources; the ultimate form of recycling, he says.  

           Antiques almost always cost far less than their new counterparts,Davissays.  As an investment, antiques can even be considered assets by financial institutions and can become a significant part of one’s wealth-building strategy.

The ABC’s of Antiquing

            According toDavis, finding the right antiques for your décor may well depend on where and how you shop.  When visiting small independent shops you will usually get personalized service and advice but sacrifice the variety and selection found in a larger establishment.   Group shops or “Antique Malls,” offer a greater selection with lower prices because dealers within the mall must compete with one another.

           For those who go antiquing, the shopping experience is half the fun.Davis recommends that shoppers frequent shops that are enjoyable to be in (lighting, music, air conditioning, etc.).  “Choose shops with a good reputation, that have easy access and parking and reliable hours.  Small and out-of-the-way shops can be frustrating to find and disappointing once you get there,” he says as their hours and inventory can be inconsistent.

           Why not map an antiquing route and spend the day shopping?  Antique shops usually congregate near one another.

           Davis cautions antique shoppers to be wary of flea markets and auctions.  Antiques found at these places often times have hidden problems and the sellers can be less than reputable, he warns.  Also, avoid shops, especially those in “tourist traps” that sell repros because many times the repros are misrepresented as authentic or not clearly marked as reproductions.

Finding that Perfect Antique

            Don’t buy antiques from just anybody, warnsDavis. Always seek advice from reputable dealers you can trust.  Follow your gut and avoid advice from amateurs, he said.

            When shopping, also buy things that you like.  “Don’t be swayed by others to purchase items you won’t want to live with,”Davisadded.  “Most importantly, buy the best you can afford.  One exceptional piece will hold value better than 10 common pieces.”

           Davis believes that mixing and matching is the way to go when furnishing your home.  “Don’t be afraid to mix antique furnishing with new things.  They’ll work great together,” he says, adding that new upholstered furniture is brought to life when complimented with antique tables and cabinets for instance.

           Also, he recommends that the internet and books are keys to educating yourself about the world of antiques.  “Today there are thousands or books and websites on every subject imaginable.  Going on EBay can be a great way to learn about antiques and their values but be careful when buying on-lineDavisnotes; “Deals that seem to be too good to be true usually are.”

          Davis also warns shoppers to beware of reproductions, fakes, undisclosed repairs and “marriages” (mismatched parts).  They are becoming increasingly common.  “Avoid purchasing items like iron doorstops, mechanical banks, Asian artifacts and other commonly reproduced items unless you have a high level of knowledge in the field.”.  Most of these on today’s market are fakes so only buy them from a dealer you can trust.

If You Love It, Haggle…

        If you like something you see… buy it while you can,Davisrecommends.  Haggle on price when appropriate.  Most dealers will accept offers of 5% to possibly 20% under their ticket price on higher priced items (usually depending on what they paid for the piece),” he says or at least they’ll counter-offer.  “Dealers want to sell but replacing the sold items is becoming more difficult so be reasonable”.

      Remember, good antiques sell very fast and will likely not be there the next time you visit.

            For more information, contact Scott Davis, at RI Antiques Mall.  Go to www.riantiquesmall.com or email RIAntiquesMall@cox.net.

            Herb Weiss is a Pawtucket-based freelance writer who likes browsing in antique stores.  His Commentaries appear in two Rhode Island daily’s The Pawtucket Times and Woonsocket Call.

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