New Study Looks at Better Ways to Instruct Caregivers

Published in Woonsocket Call on October 2, 2016

A new report released by United Hospital Fund and AARP Public Policy Institute, using feedback directly gathered from caregivers in focus groups, provides valuable insight as to how video instruction and training materials can be improved to help caregivers provide medication and wound care management.

AARP Public Policy Institute contracted with United Hospital Fund (UHF) to organize the discussion groups, which took place in March through December of 2015 and were conducted in English, Spanish, and Chinese. A new report, , released on September 29, 2016, summarizes key themes from the discussions and suggests a list of “do’s and don’ts” for video instruction.

Gathering Advice from Caregivers

In a series of six discussion groups with diverse family caregivers — 20 women and 13 men of varying ages and cultures (Spanish and Chinese) — in New York, participants reported feeling unprepared for the complex medical and nursing tasks they were expected to perform at home for their family member. The participants reported that educational videos lack instructional information and also failed to address their emotional caregiving issues. Stories about poor care coordination came up during the discussions, too.

“These discussion groups gave family caregivers a chance to describe their frustration with the lack of preparation for tasks like wound care and administering medication through a central catheter. But participants also demonstrated how resourceful they were in finding solutions on their own,” said Carol Levine, director of UHF’s Families and Health Care Project and a co-author of the report.

According to Levine, this initiative to study caregiver perspectives on educational videos and materials is an outgrowth of a 2012 report, Home Alone: Family Caregivers Providing Complex Chronic Care, released by UHF and the AARP Public Policy Institute. The findings of this on-line national survey of a representative sample of caregivers noted that 46 percent of family caregivers across the nation were performing complicated medical and nursing tasks such as managing medications, providing wound care, and operating equipment for a family member with multiple chronic conditions. These caregivers felt they were not being adequately prepared by the health care system to perform these tasks and they told researchers that they were often stressed, depressed, and worried about making a mistake. Most of these caregivers had no help at home.

The new caregiving report is an important resource for AARP’s broader national initiative known as the Home Alone AllianceSM which seeks to bring together diverse public and private partners to make sweeping cultural changes in addressing the needs of family caregivers. “The wealth of information we learned from these discussion groups has guided the development of our first series of videos for family caregivers on medication management, and will inform future instructional videos,” said Susan C. Reinhard, RN, PhD, Senior Vice President of AARP Public Policy Institute and co-author of the report. Specific segments of the first series of videos include Guide to Giving Injections; Beyond Pills: Eye Drops, Patches, and Suppositories; and Overcoming Challenges: Medication and Dementia. The videos are on the AARP Public Policy Institute’s website and United Hospital Fund’s Next Step in Care website. Additional video series will focus on topics including wound care, preventing pressure ulcers, and mobility.

In preparation for the discussion group (lasting up to 2 hours and held on different days and locations) ), UHF staff reviewed literature on video instruction and adult learning theory for patients and caregivers and selected several currently available videos on education management and wound care to show to caregivers to stimulate discussion and cull feedback on content and presentation style. Felise Milan, MD, an adult learning theory expert at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, was a consultant to the project.

A New Way of Teaching

For UHF’s Carol Levine, one of the biggest insights of this study was the resourcefulness shown by caregivers in “finding information [about managing medication and wound care] that they had not been provided, creating their own solutions when necessary.” “These are strengths that are seldom recognized,” she says.

“We found that caregivers were eager to learn how to manage medications and do wound care more comfortably for the patient and less stressful for themselves. Providers often use the same techniques they would use to train nursing students or other trainees, and are not aware how the emotional attachment of caregiver to patient affects the tasks, and how adults need learning based on their own experiences, not textbook learning,” says Levine, stressing that providers need more time to work with caregivers to provide follow-up supervision.

Existing teaching videos used for providing information to caregivers were generally found not to incorporate adult learning theory, says Levine, noting that they were intended to teach students, not caregivers. “In watching the videos, the caregivers clearly stated that they wanted to see people like themselves learning to do the tasks, not just a provider demonstrating them. They also didn’t respond well to attempts at humor. For them, these tasks are serious business, and they want information, not entertainment,” she added.

Levine says that she believes that videos and interactive online instruction can be a powerful tool in helping caregivers learn and practice at home. “We encourage other organizations to consider developing videos in the area of their expertise, and we encourage all who communicate with caregivers to look at the list of “Dos and Don’ts” for advice about presenting information in ways that caregivers can best absorb it [detailed in her recently released report].

“However, we strongly believe that good clinical advice and supervision are essential. Videos are not “instead of” they are “along with” clinical care,” adds Levine.

CARE Act Gives More Info to Rhode Island Caregivers

“The report reflects the need to make family caregivers more confident that they have the knowledge and instructions to provide the best possible care of their loved ones,” said AARP State Director Kathleen Connell. “This is why implementation of the CARE (Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable) Act will be so important here in Rhode Island, as it addresses some of the anxiety that accompanies a patient’s hospital discharge.

“In most cases, hospitals do their best to prepare patients for discharge, but instruction has not always been focused on preparing a designated caregiver for medical tasks they may be required to perform. The CARE Act is designed to provide caregivers with the information and support they need. As the report indicates, an instructional video may not always answer all their questions. Like physicians, caregivers feel they should abide by the ‘first do no harm’ approach. And that’s hard sometimes if there is uncertainty that comes from a lack of instruction. Caregivers also are especially tentative about treating wounds and managing medications.

“This can lead to some unfortunate outcomes: Patients can suffer when mistakes are made; caregivers feel increased or debilitating stress; and hospitals readmission rates go up.
“In short, we need to listen to caregivers and all work together to support the work they do.”

For a copy of the caregiver report, go to http://www.uhfnyc.org/publications/881158.

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