Report Hones in on Caregiving Costs

Published in Woonsocket Call on November 20, 2016

On the last day of October, a 537 word proclamation issued by President Barack Obama proclaimed November 2016 as National Family Caregiver (NFC) month. In this official decree the president encouraged the nation to pay tribute to 90 million caregivers who work tirelessly care for family members, friends, and even neighbors.

Obama recognizing the nation’s caregivers came about through the lobbying efforts of Caregiver Action Network (the National Family Caregivers Association). The Washington, DC-based group began its efforts to nationally recognize family caregivers in 1994. Three years later, President Clinton signed the first NFC Month Presidential Proclamation and every president since that time has followed suit by issuing an annual proclamation recognizing and honoring family caregivers each November.

On the heels of Obama’s signed proclamation comes the release of a new AARP report that details the out-of-pocket cost of caregiving. According to researchers, family caregivers spend an average of nearly 20 percent of their income providing care for a family member or other loved one. Along with increased out-of-pocket (OOP) expense, the study also explores other financial and personal strains that family caregivers may experience as result of their caregiving activities.

The Financial Strain of Caregiving

AARP’s 56 page research report “Family Caregiving and Out-of-Pocket Costs: 2016 Report,” noted that caregivers spend an average of $6,954 in OOP costs related to caregiving, with Hispanic/Latino and low-income family caregivers spending an average of 44 percent of their total annual income.

“This study spotlights the financial toll on family caregivers – particularly those with modest incomes,” said AARP Executive Vice President and Chief Advocacy and Engagement Officer Nancy LeaMond. “Whether helping to pay for services or make home modifications, the costs can be enormous and may put their own economic and retirement security at risk. As a nation, we need to do more to support America’s greatest support system. Passing the bipartisan Credit for Caring Act that provides a federal tax credit of up to $3,000 would give some sorely needed financial relief to eligible family caregivers.”

AARP’s report, released November 14, 2016, determined the amount of money that family caregivers spent over the last year providing help or assistance to a loved one. Certain groups of family caregivers spend disproportionately more in OOP expenses, said the researchers.

AARP’s report, prepared by Chuck Rainville, Laura Skufca and Laura Mehegan, noted that family caregivers of all ages spend $6,954 in OOP costs related to caregiving on average. They are earning less than $32,500 are under significant financial strain, spending an average of 44 percent of their annual income on caregiving.

Family caregivers caring for adults with dementia spend nearly twice the OOP costs ($10,697) than those caring for adults without dementia ($5,758), the AARP report found.

Cultural Diversity and Caregiver Costs

Researchers looked at cultural diversity as it related to OOP expenses of family caregivers. According to their findings, Hispanic/Latino family caregivers spend an average of $9,022 representing 44 percent of their total income per year. By comparison, African American family caregivers spend $6,616 or 34 percent, white family caregivers spend $6,964 or 14 percent, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders spend $2,935 or 9 percent.

As expected, long-distance family caregivers had the highest OOP costs at $11,923 compared with family caregivers living with or nearby their care recipients.

The AARP report notes that increased OOP forces family caregivers to dip into savings, cut back on personal their spending, and they save less for retirement. Some must take out loans to make financial ends meet. Additionally, more than half of family caregivers are cutting back on leisure spending and also reported a report a work-related strain such as having to take unpaid time off.

“Many family caregivers experience a great deal of physical, emotional, and financial strain,” added Susan Reinhard, RN, PhD, Senior Vice President and Director, AARP Public Policy Institute. “This report highlights why AARP supports the bipartisan Recognize, Assist, Include, Support, and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Act that would require the development of a national strategy to support family caregivers.”

AARP Rhode Island State Director Kathleen Connell says that AARP’s recently released report verifies what most family caregivers know all too well: Providing for a loved one challenges caregivers in many ways and out-of-pocket expenses certainly is one of them, she says.

“In conversations I’ve had with caregivers over the years, I have found most all consider their efforts a responsibility as well as a labor of love. They rarely complain about cost because, I suspect, they try never to characterize caregiving as a burden,” says Connell..

Connell says, “With passage of the CARE Act and its implementation coming in 2017, Rhode Island is among the states leading the way in caregiver support. We cannot rest. You may be a caregiver. You may know a caregiver. You may someday rely on a caregiver. Any way you look at it, you need to be in the conversation about future needs.”

This study of a nationally representative sample of 1,864 family caregivers was conducted by GfK from July 18–August 28, 2016. All study respondents were currently providing unpaid care to a relative or friend age 18 or older to help them take care of themselves.

The full results of AARP’s caregiver report can be found here: http://www.aarp.org/caregivercosts

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