Caregivers Taking Care of Persons with Dementia Have Unique Needs

Published in the Woonsocket Call on December 9, 2018

Being a caregiver 24/7 to a person in relatively good health is a tough job. But, caring for someone with dementia, becomes a 36 hour, say Authors Nancy L. Mace and Peter V. Rabins, in their ground-breaking book (published in 1981) on providing care for those with the devastating mental disorder.

The Washington, DC-based AARP releases survey findings last month that takes a look at this “unique subset of caregivers” who are taking care of persons with dementia and other cognitive disorders. Caregiving takes a physical, and emotional toll on these individuals, forcing them to put in longer hours providing care and making adjustments at work and in their personal relationships, says the findings of the newly released study.

The AARP online national survey (of caregivers 18 and older) takes a look at the demands on 700 caregivers taking care of persons with dementia or other forms of cognitive impairments (most often their parents), as well as 400 caregivers who were providing care for a loved one without dementia. Regardless of the situation, on average, caregivers report having been caring for their loved one for almost 3 years.

“Family caregivers take on big responsibilities that can be physically, emotionally and financially challenging. AARP’s new research shows that this can be particularly true for those caring for loved ones with dementia,” said Nancy LeaMond, AARP Chief Advocacy and Engagement Officer, in a statement released with the study report, Caring for People with Dementia: Caregivers’ Experiences. “That’s why AARP has developed resources to help family caregivers balance their own needs with the needs of their loved one,” adds LeaMond.

The AARP Study Found…

Obviously, it is time consuming to be a caregiver. The AARP Survey’s findings, released on November 30, 2018, found that 7 in 10 of those surveyed spend less time with friends and more than half spend less time with other family members because of the intensity of caregiving responsibilities While 75 percent of the survey respondents reported that caring for someone with dementia has brought about closer relationships and more meaning to their lives, the findings also indicate that caregiving experiences bring greater challenges to their lives, too.

According to the 26-page AARP report’s findings, those caring for persons with dementia (more likely a parent) spend on average 13.7 hours per week caregiving while caregivers, taking care of persons with no cognitive afflictions, spend 11.7 hours (more likely a spouse or partner or a friend or neighbor). Three in ten of the caregiver respondents (over age 35) spend over 21 hours per week caregiving, says Study’s findings.

Most of the caregiver respondents providing care to persons with dementia see the devastating disorder’s slowly progressing over time. But younger caregivers perceive that the onset of cognitive decline as suddenly happening.

About 32 percent of the caregiver respondents providing more intense caregiving to persons with dementia say managing their emotions and the demands of care (26 percent) they deliver as the biggest challenges the face.

Caregivers taking care of persons with dementia also reported negative health behaviors. They slept less (71 percent), had more anxiety (65 percent) and depression (54 percent), and spent less time on themselves and with their friends. Research studies reveal that social isolation and loneliness are linked to poorer physical and mental health outcomes.

Not only are the millions of family caregivers for those with dementia less socially connected, they are significantly more likely to put off medical care – over half (55 percent) have done so, compared to just 38 percent among the total caregiver population. However, there were positive health behaviors identified in the poll as well – 79 percent took steps to maintain or improve their brain health and 47 percent exercised more.

About 62 percent of those taking care of persons with dementia state that their intense caregiving responsibilities have led them to working different hours, leaving work early (62 percent) or take paid (53 percent) and unpaid time off (47 percent) for caregiving duties, and also worry about their finances.

But, two-thirds of all caregivers surveyed say they feel closer to their loved one, but those taking care of persons with dementia were more likely to say their relationship with their loved one over time had grown further apart (22 percent) than others. Those caregivers of persons with dementia were more likely to say the relationship with other family has been strained.

Finally, caregiver respondents say that they are receiving what they need from health care providers yet those caring for someone with dementia also have sought out more information about caregiving and from a greater variety of sources.

The AARP survey was conducted October 1-10, 2018. Data are weighted by income, gender, and age according to caregiver benchmarks obtained in Caregiving in the U.S. (2015).

Finding Caregiver Resources

AARP helps family caregivers find the information and support they need to manage their own care along with their loved one’s care. Go to http://www.aarp.org/caregiving for more resources and information on family caregiving, including AARP’s Dementia Care Guide and the Community Resource Finder.

For more info, contact AARP Researcher G. Oscar Anderson at ganderson@aarp.org.

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The Growing Incidence of Alzheimer’s

Published in Pawtucket Times on April 26, 2016

While Congress and states are nation grappling with how to put the brakes to one of the largest public health crises in recent times, the escalating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) epidemic, the Chicago-based Alzheimer’s Association releases its annual snap shot detailing statistics on the impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on caregivers and health care costs..

According to the 2016 Alzheimer’s disease Facts and Figures, released on March 30, 2016, this year nearly 16 million Alzheimer’s caregivers will provide 18 billion hours of unpaid care to 5.4 million afflicted with this devastating disorder. That care had an estimated value of $221.3 billion, says the report.

But that’s not all, this recently released report notes that two out of three people believe that Medicare will help them over costly nursing facility costs. Sorry it won’t. AD also has a direct impact on a caregiver’s pocketbook, too, the researchers found. More than one-third of those surveyed say they were forced by caregiving duties to reduce their hours at work or just quit their job entirely. As a result of these actions their income dropped by $15,000 compared to the previous year. Eleven percent of caregivers were forced to cut back on spending for their children’s education in order to provide support.

The 79 page Alzheimer’s Association report notes that both physical, emotional and financial support required by a person with AD may ultimately deprive family and friend care givers basic necessities, such as food, transportation and medical care. The Facts and Figures report reveals that these caregivers were 28 percent more likely to eat less or go hungry while contributing care to someone with AD, and one-fifth even sacrificed their own medical care by cutting back on doctor visits. Overall, nearly half of the caregivers say they cut back on their own expenses to afford dementia-related care for their family member or friend.

“The devastating emotional and physical effects of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease has been well-studied,” said Beth Kallmyer, MSW, Vice President of Constituent Services for the Alzheimer’s Association. “However, this new report shows, for the first time, the enormous personal financial sacrifices that millions of care contributors must make every day. These sacrifices jeopardize the financial security of individuals and families, as well as their access to basic needs and health care.”

This year’s Facts and Figures report found that 13 percent of family or friend caregivers sold personal belongings, such as a car, to help pay for costs related to dementia, while nearly half tapped into savings or retirement funds. On average, caregivers, many of whom do not live with the person they’re caring for, spent more than $5,000 a year of their own money to care for someone with AD; however, amounts varied with many spending tens of thousands of dollars per year.
Incidents of AD is Fast Growing

The Facts and Figures report says that out of the 5.4 million (of all ages) afflicted with AD, an estimated 5.2 million are age 65 and over. Yes, one in nine people having the cognitive disorder. Approximately 200,000, having early onset AD, are under age 65.

Also, the recently released Facts and Figures report warns that we are truly in the midst of an AD epidemic as the baby boomers grow older. By 2050, researchers say that someone in the United States will develop AD every 33 seconds. Without a medical breakthroughs to prevent or cure, the age 65 and over population with AD, the incidence is expected to nearly triple, from 5.2 million to a projected 13.8 million. Some say may be even as high as 16 million. It’s the only disease among the top 10 causes of death in America that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. .

Additionally, this year’s Facts and Figure report notes that AD is officially listed as the sixth-leading cause of death in this country. It is the fifth-leading cause of death for people age 65 and older. With the graying of America, AD will become a more common cause of death. At age 70, 61 percent of those with AD are expected to die before the age of 80 compared with 30 percent of people without the cognitive disorder — a rate twice as high, says the report.

The Typical Care Giver

The Facts and Figures report puts the face on a typical caregiver. Approximately two-thirds of caregivers are women, and 34 percent are age 65 or older. Forty one percent have a household income of $50,000 or less.

AD takes a devastating toll on the health of caregivers, says the Facts and Figures report. Nearly 60 percent of those taking care of loved ones with Alzheimer’s and dementia report that their emotional stress being high or very high. About 40 percent suffer from depression. One in five care givers cut back on their own physician visits because of their caregiving responsibilities. And, among caregivers, 74 percent report they are “somewhat” to “very” concerned about maintaining their own health since becoming a caregiver.

A Huge Cost on the Health Care System

The report’s researchers warn that the AD epidemic might just bankrupt the nation’s Medicare program. In 2016, total payments for health care, long-term care and hospice are estimated to be $236 billion for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, with just under half of the costs paid by Medicare. Nearly one in every five Medicare dollars is spent on people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. In 2050, it will be one in every three dollars

Medicare and Medicaid are expected to cover $160 billion, or 68 percent, of the total health care and long-term care payments for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

Seeing a huge rise in AD over the last two years, federal and state officials are gearing up to strategize a battle to fight the impending epidemic.

A Call to Action

Yes, the AD epidemic is here, right in Rhode Island. Everyone is personally touched by either caring for a family member with the cognitive disorder or knows someone who is a caregiver or afflicted.

Following the efforts of Congress to create a national strategic plan to address the rapidly escalating AD crisis and to coordinate resources across federal agencies, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a joint resolution enacted into law to direct the Lt. Governor’s Long Term Care Coordinating Council (LTCCC) to be the vehicle to develop a state plan to address this growing public health crisis in the Ocean State. Ultimately, for over a year former Lt. Governor Elizabeth Roberts along with LTCCC members, former Division of Elderly Affairs Director Catherine Taylor, the state Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, universities and health care organizations with the public input gleaned from 8 listening events hammered out the 122 page battle plan with over 30 pages of recommendations.

In 2016, Lt. Governor Daniel J. McKee has picked up the ball and convened a meeting of the Executive Board on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders, consisting of researchers, advocates, clinicians and caregivers, to begin efforts to implement recommendations from the State’s Alzheimer’s Plan. The group will determine which recommendations are outdated.

With a rising population of Rhode Islander’s with AD, state policy makers must act swiftly and lose no more time in addressing this terrible disease and public health issue.

Report: Alzheimer’s Poses Greater Risk for Older Women than Men

Published in Pawtucket Times, May 11, 2014

According to the Alzheimer’s Association 2014 Alzheimer’s disease Facts and Figures report released last Month, a woman’s estimated lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s at age 65 is 1 in 6, compared with nearly 1 in 11 for a man. As real a concern as breast cancer is to women’s health, women age 60 and over are about twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s over the rest of their lives as they are to develop breast cancer, says the this years’ report.

The Facts and Figures report, an official report of the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research, is a comprehensive compilation of national statistics and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. The 75 page report conveys the impact of Alzheimer’s on individuals, families, government and the nation’s health care system. Since its 2007 inaugural release, the detailed report has become the most cited source covering the broad spectrum of Alzheimer’s issues.

“Through our role in the development of The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes on Alzheimer’s in 2010, in conjunction with Maria Shriver, we know that women are the epicenter of Alzheimer’s disease, representing majority of both people with the disease and Alzheimer’s caregivers. The recently released Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures examines the impact of this unbalanced burden,” said Angela Geiger, chief strategy officer of the Alzheimer’s Association. “Well-deserved investments in breast cancer and other leading causes of death such as heart disease, stroke and HIV/AIDS have resulted in substantial decreases in death. Geiger calls for comparable investments in research to reach the same levels of successfully preventing and treating Alzheimer’s as the other leading causes of death.

Adding to women’s Alzheimer’s burden, there are 2.5 times as many women as men providing intensive “on- duty” care 24 hours for someone living with Alzheimer’s disease, says the report, also noting that among caregivers who feel isolated, women are much more likely than men to link isolation with feeling depressed (17 percent of women verse. 2 percent of men).

Also noted in the 2014 Alzheimer’s’ Facts and Figures report released on March 19, 2014, the strain of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is also felt in the nation’s workplace, too. Among caregivers who have been employed while they were also care giving, 20 percent of women verse. 3 percent of men went from working full-time to working part-time while acting as a caregiver. The report also noted that 18 percent of women versus. 11 percent of men took a leave of absence while 11 percent of women verses 5 percent of men gave up work entirely. Finally, 10 percent of women verse 5 percent of men lost job benefits.

Far Reaching Fiscal Human Impact of Alzheimer’s

Meanwhile the Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures report noted that there are more than 5 million Americans living with this devastating disorder, including 3.2 million women and 200,000 people under the age of 65 with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease (see my May 9, 2013 Commentary). However, Alzheimer’s has far-reaching effects by impacting entire families. Also, it was reported that there are currently 15.5 million caregivers providing 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care throughout the nation, often severely impacting their own health. The physical and emotional impact of dementia care giving resulted in an estimated $9.3 billion in increased healthcare costs for Alzheimer’s caregivers in 2013.

The total national cost of caring for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is projected to reach $214 billion this year, says the 2014 Facts and Figures report, not including unpaid care giving by family and friends valued at more than $220 billion. In 2014, the cost to Medicare and Medicaid of caring for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias will reach a combined $150 billion with Medicare spending nearly $1 in every $5 on people with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.

The Facts and Figures report predicts the cost numbers to soar as the baby boomers continue to enter the age of greatest risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Unless something is done to change the course of the devastating disorder, there could be as many as 16 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s in 2050, at a cost of $1.2 trillion (in current dollars) to the nation. This dramatic rise includes a 500 percent increase in combined Medicare and Medicaid spending and a 400 percent increase in out-of-pocket spending.

The country’s first-ever National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s disease has a goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. Ensuring strong implementation of the National Alzheimer’s Plan, including adequately funding Alzheimer’s research, is the best way to avoid these staggering human and financial tolls.

Lack of Understanding of the Alzheimer’s’ Disease

“Despite being the nation’s biggest health threat, Alzheimer’s disease is still largely misunderstood. Everyone with a brain — male or female, family history or not — is at risk for Alzheimer’s,” said Geiger. “Age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s, and America is aging. As a nation, we must band together to protect our greatest asset, our brains.”

In 2010, the Alzheimer’s Association in partnership with Maria Shriver and The Shriver Report conducted a groundbreaking poll with the goal of exploring the compelling connection between Alzheimer’s disease and women. Data from that poll were published in The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes on Alzheimer’s, which also included essays and reflections that gave personal perspectives to the poll’s numbers. For the first time, that report revealed not only the striking impact of the disease on individual lives, but also its especially strong effects on women — women living with the disease, as well as women who are caregivers, relatives, friends and loved ones of those directly affected.

Realizing the impact Alzheimer’s has on women — and the impact women can have when they work together — the Alzheimer’s Association is launching a national initiative this spring highlighting the power of women in the fight against this disease. To join the movement, visit http://www.alz.org/mybrain.

Maureen Maigret, policy consultant for the Senior Agenda Coalition of Rhode Island and Coordinator of the Rhode Island Older Woman’s Policy Group, concurs with the findings of the Alzheimer’s disease Facts and Figures report. She calls for the education of elected officials on the facts about Alzheimer’s disease and its greater prevalence among women. “It is clearly a tragedy for the women effected with the disease, and can be devastating for their caregivers, mostly daughters, trying to keep them at home,” she says.

Maigret says that Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias at the state level have tremendous implications for this state’s budget. “Data show that in Rhode Island, about three-quarters of persons in nursing homes paid for by Medicaid are older women. An overwhelming number of them have some cognitive decline or dementia, she notes.

“We must do more to ensure that quality long-term care is available for persons with dementia and that robust caregiver support services are in place for the many families dealing with parents, spouses and other loved ones suffering from this disease,” says Maigret, stressing that government funding on research must also be greatly increased in the hopes of finding a cure or ways to prevent its onset.

Director Catherine Taylor, of the state’s Division of Elderly Affairs, believes that the Alzheimer’s’ Association’s released 2014 Facts and Figures report, about a woman’s lifetime risk of developing the devastating cognitive disorder verses breast cancer “really help us understand, in stark terms, what a public health crisis Alzheimer’s disease is, especially for women.”

Taylor notes that the Ocean State is in the implementation phase of its State Plan on Alzheimer’s disease and Related Dementias (see my November 13, 2013 commentary), where state officials are working to improve information, care and supports for every family that confronts Alzheimer’s disease. “The work will continue until there’s a cure,” she says.

“It’s important to note that new research findings also indicates that up to half of the cases of Alzheimer’s disease may be linked to risk factors “within our control,” states Taylor, adding that reducing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease may be a simple as eating a healthy diet, staying active, learning new skills, and maintaining maintain strong connections with family, friends and community.

For those concerned about their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, join Prevent AD, Rhode Island’s Alzheimer’s disease Prevention Registry. Prevent AD volunteers will learn about prevention studies for which they may be qualified to participate in, as well as the latest news on brain health. For more information, call (401) 444-0789.

The full text of the Alzheimer’s Association 2014 Facts and Figures can be viewed at http://www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2014.pdf. The full report also appeared in the March 2014 issue of Alzheimer’s & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association (Volume 10, Issue 2).

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12, is a Pawtucket-based writer who covers aging, health care and medical issues. He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.