Fogarty Retiring as Elderly Affairs Director

Published in Woonsocket Call on January 28, 2018

Just days ago, Director of Rhode Island’s Division of Elderly Affairs (RIDEA), Charles J. Fogarty, announced his retirement to take place at the end of June, after 4 decades of public service. There have been nine directors since the establishment of DEA, including Fogarty.

Fogarty’s plans to retire at the end of the current legislative session. When this occurs, Governor Gina Raimondo will make an appointment to the RIDEA director position. The position requires advice and consent of the RI Senate.

Fogarty began his career in public service in 1978 as a junior policy advisor for Governor J. Joseph Garrahy. He served as lieutenant governor, from 1999 to 2007, having the distinction of being the last lieutenant governor to preside over the State Senate. From 2011 to 2015, Fogarty served as the director of the Department of Labor and Training, ending up his career as the Director of RIDEA.

During his years of public service, Fogarty, 62, has been focused on long term care and home- and community-based services and supports for older Rhode Islanders. He played a key role in steering and expanding the work of the Long-Term Care Coordinating Council during his tenure as Lieutenant Governor for two terms. Under his leadership at the Department of Labor and Training, he reformed the unemployment insurance process. During his stewardship as Director at Elderly Affairs (since January 2015), he has led a division providing services and advocacy for over 166,500 older adults living in Rhode Island.

As a Glocester resident he was elected to the Glocester Town Council in 1984 and in 1990 was elected as a state senator, where he served for eight years. While a state senator, he served as both majority whip and Senate President Pro Tempore.

Fogarty Reflects on RIDEA Tenure

“Throughout my career, I have felt drawn to serve the people of Rhode Island. I look back fondly and feel fortunate to be a part of the forward progress Rhode Island is experiencing–particularly working with Governor Raimondo to empower seniors and help them to remain independent and living in the community,” said Fogarty.

According to Fogarty, under his helm, RIDEA has continued to process of supporting community-and home-based services for seniors and caregivers, but more needs to be done in order to really rebalance Rhode Island’ long-term care system. Aging in the community- in our own homes- is what many Rhode Islanders want for ourselves and our loved ones, he says.

“We’ve restored funding for Meals on Wheels, provided additional funding for respite services, and this year are proposing to double the amount the state invests in senior centers. Senior centers are primary gateways in the community that connect older adults and caregivers to services that can have profound impacts upon their ability to remain healthy and independent,” notes Fogarty.

Fogarty says, “If the general assembly follows Governor Raimondo’s lead and doubles the funding for senior centers, Rhode Island will be taking a huge step in the right direction of providing the appropriate support to these essential senior services.”

“We need to prepare for the shift in demographics that is occurring, and accept that the old model of providing long term care services isn’t working for the large number of Boomers who are marching towards retirement and old-age. RIDEA and other key partners are engaging in the Age-Friendly Rhode Island initiative, and we all need to work together to provide more choices and options for Rhode Islanders as they age, empowering them, and helping them to remain independent and healthy,” adds Fogarty.

Tributes to Fogarty

“Charlie has dedicated his entire professional life to Rhode Island and we thank him for his decades of service to our state,” said Governor Gina M. Raimondo, in a statement, recognizing the key role he played as DEA Director in expanding Meals on Wheels and in repealing the tax that seniors pay on their Social Security.

“As sitting Lt. Governor, I appreciate Charlie being a resource to me on issues important to our state’s seniors. Under his leadership, the Division of Elderly Affairs has been a hands-on partner in executing the initiatives of the Long Term Care Coordinating Council and the Alzheimer’s Executive Board,, says Lt. Governor Dan McKee.

“We are especially grateful for Charlie’s support in launching our Age Friendly RI Report in 2016. In a few weeks, we will be announcing an exciting development in Rhode Island’s Alzheimer’s State Plan that would not be possible without Charlie’s participation. I have enjoyed working with Charlie and I wish him all the best as he begins this exciting new chapter,” adds McKee.

Maureen Maigret, Vice Chair Long Term Care Coordinating Council, sees Fogarty’s experience as oversight as Lt. Governor of the state’s Long-Term Coordinating Council, gave him the insight ad understanding of long term care issues and the needs of older Rhode Islanders.

Maigret says that professionals in the aging network will remember Fogarty for his strong support for and educating the community about need to expand services that help older persons to stay at home and live independently for as long as possible and to pay attention to caregiver support needs.

Adds AARP Rhode Island State Director Kathleen Connell, “I have known Charlie for many years and know him to be a worthy heir of his uncle, the late-great RI Congressman, who was a leading champion of legislation and policy benefiting older Americans.”

“At Elderly Affairs, he utilized many skills and resourcefulness acquired through his time as a legislator, Lt. Governor and Labor & Training director — not to mention his personal interest in the health and wellbeing of all Rhode Islanders. His leadership has been an enormous asset at the Division of Elderly Affairs,” says Connell.

After his retirement from four decades of state service, he will continue to serve on the faculty at Johnson & Wales University, as Adjunct Professor of Leadership Studies. He also plans to volunteer with Meals on Wheels, having seen the significant impact the home-delivery meal program has on combatting senior isolation. He will also continue to be involved at his church.

On a personal level, Fogarty plans to “learn to cook,” by enrolling in cooking classes, travel and perhaps learn to speak Spanish.

 

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New Approach to Support Caregivers Needed

Published in Woonsocket Call on September 18, 2016

Currently 18 million people across the nation provide assistance with activities of daily living, transportation, finances, wound care and giving injections to their aging parents, spouses, family and friends. AARP Rhode Island estimates that 148,000 Rhode Islanders are caregivers. The future is bleak for those requiring caregiving assistance in the near future. According to a recently leased report by The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), the need for family caregivers will drastically increase but demographic shifts reduce the potential pool of caregivers to tap.

Being a Caregiver in America

The 340 page NASEM report (taking 20 months to produce) calls for the retooling of the nation’s health and long-term care delivery system through team based care (using a person and family care model approach) and policy changes to better support family caregivers in the delivery of care to older Americans.

The recommendations detailed in Families Caring for an Aging America, released on September 13, 2016, challenges policy makers “to transform the health care experience for older adults and their family caregivers,” says Nancy Morrow-Howell, PhD, president of the Washington, D.C.-based The Gerontological (GSA) Society of America, the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging. “The approach requires a multidimensional, interdisciplinary effort that spans diverse settings of care. GSA strongly supports this effort to create a person- and family-centered model for team-based care that recognizes and rewards the role of the family caregiver,” she notes.

Adds Richard Schulz, who chaired NASEM’s Committee on Family Caregiving for Older Adults (consisting of 19 caregiving experts) that oversaw this study and who serves as Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, “Ignoring family caregivers leaves them unprepared for the tasks they are expected to perform, carrying significant economic and personal burdens.”

Schultz adds, “Caregivers are potentially at increased risk for adverse effects in virtually every aspect of their lives – from their health and quality of life to their relationships and economic security. If the needs of the caregivers are not addressed, we as a society are compromising the well-being of elders. Supporting family caregivers should be an integral part of the nation’s collective responsibility for caring for its older adult population.”

According to a release, NASEM’s highly anticipated report noted that by 2030, 72.8 million U.S. residents – more than 1 in 5 – will age 65 or older. According to the National Survey of Caregivers, in 2011, 17.7 million people – or approximately 7.7 percent of the total U.S. population aged 20 and older – were caregivers of an older adult because of health problems or functional impairments. This estimate does not include caregivers of nursing home residents.

Furthermore, being a caregiver is not a short-term obligation, says the report, noting that the median number of years of family care for older adults with high needs is around five years. The proportion of older adults who are most likely to need intensive support from caregivers – those in their 80s and beyond – is projected to climb from 27 percent in 2012 to 37 percent by 2050.

A Shrinking Pool of Caregivers

The NASEM’s Family Caregiving Committee says that little policy action has been taken to prepare the nation’s health care and social service delivery systems for this demographic shift. While the need for caregiving is rapidly increasing, the number of the potential family caregivers is shrinking. Current demographic trends – including lower fertility, higher rates of childlessness, and increases in divorced and never-married statuses – will decrease the pool of potential caregivers in the near future. Unlike past years, aging baby boomers and seniors will have fewer family members to rely on for their care because they will more likely be unmarried or divorced and living alone, and may be even geographically separated from their children.

The in-depth report found that family caregivers typically provide health and medical care at home, navigate a very complicated and fragmented health care and long-term services and support systems, and serve as surrogate decision makers. Although these individuals play a key role caring for older adults with disabilities and complex health needs, they are oftentimes marginalized or ignored by health care providers. Caregivers may be excluded from treatment decisions and care planning by providers who assume that they will provide a wide range of tasks called for in the older adult’s care plan.

Confirming other research studies, the committee found that caregivers have higher rates of depressive symptoms, anxiety, stress, social isolation, and emotional difficulties. Evidence also suggests that they experience lower physical well-being, elevated levels of stress hormones, higher rates of chronic disease, and impaired preventive health behaviors.

Those taking care of very impaired older adults are at the greatest risk of economic harm, because of the many hours of care and supervision they provide. However, caregiving can provide valuable lessons, helping the caregiver deal with difficult problems and bringing them closer to the recipient of care.

Next Steps

NASEM’s report calls for the next presidential administration to take immediate action to confront the health, economic, and social issues facing family caregivers. Also, the committee urges the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with other federal agencies, and private-sector organizations, to develop and implement a National Family Caregiver Strategy that recognizes the essential role family caregivers play in the well-being of older adults.

The report recommends that the nation’s health and long-term care systems must support caregiver’s health, values, and social and economic well-being, as well as address the needs of the of a growing caregiver population that is both culturally and ethnically diverse.

Federal programs (such as Medicare, Medicaid and Veterans Affairs) must also develop, test and implement effective mechanisms to ensure that family caregivers are routinely identified, assessed, and supported. Payment reforms can motivate providers to engage caregivers in the delivery of health care, too.

AARP Rhode Island State Director Kathleen Connell agrees with the NASEM’s report’s assessment that the importance of a caregiver’s role in an aging society cannot be overstated. At her organization she clearly sees an increased demand for caregivers and knows all-to-well the impact of a shrinking pool of potential caregivers on those in need.

“It is essential that we take action now to do all we can to remove obstacles and additional financial strain and mitigate physical and mental stress where possible for caregivers,” says Connell. AARP has compiled a wealth of research and information on aging issues that can be accessed on http://www.AARP.org.

Final Thoughts…

On Jan. 1, 2016, a new Rhode Island law took effect that would help Rhode Islanders avoid costly and time-consuming red tape when exercising health care, financial and other legal responsibilities for their out-of-state, elderly loved ones.

Why reinvent the wheel? Rhode Island law makers, the state’s Division on Elderly Affairs and the Lt. Governor’s Long-Term Care Coordinating Council can do more to support the state’s growing caregiver population. With the next session of the Rhode Island General Assembly starting in January 2017, state officials and lawmakers can reach out to other states to learn what state-of-the art caregiver programs can be implemented here.

For a copy of the report go to: nationalacademies.org/caregiving

LTC Must Be Placed on Candidates’ Radar Screen

Published in the Woonsocket Call on May 29, 2016

Presidential candidates might just think twice about their political campaign positions on long-term care. With the graying of nation’s voters, Congress will be pushed to put long-term care on its policy agenda. When the dust settles after the Democratic and GOP conventions, the winning candidates must address long-term care issues in their debates before the November election.

In 2013, America’s age 65 or older population made up only 14 percent of the total population, but by 2040, this demographic group will nearly double to comprise about 22 percent. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services the majority of these individuals will require some form of long-term care services (specifically, help with activities of daily living—such as cooking, bathing, or remembering to take medicine—that can be provided in a home or institutional setting.)

Misconceptions About Medicare and Social Security

Survey results in a 17 page report, “Long-Term Care in America: Expectations and Preferences for Care and Caregiving, released by Associated Press (AP)-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, notes that most older Americans expect Medicare and Social Security to pay for long-term care services while these federal programs generally do not. The survey findings also indicate that respondents, age 40 and over, strongly supported public policies that help a person save for long-term care services and for those that defray the cost of care giving, including state paid family leave programs.

“This survey provides much-needed data on how people perceive the issue of long-term care in the United States,” says Trevor Tompson, director of The AP-NORC Center, in a statement released on May 16, 2016 with the survey findings… “The need for long-term care services and support to assist seniors with activities of daily living is increasing exponentially. Financing high-quality services so that the costs are manageable for families and governments will remain a big challenge for decision-makers,” he added.

“Older Americans of today and tomorrow have a 50 percent chance of living with substantial and often expensive daily needs,” adds Dr. Bruce A. Chernof, President and CEO of The SCAN Foundation. “Medicare and Social Security were not built to cover long-term care, leaving American families unprotected, and as the survey shows, unaware of this fact,” he says.

The AP-NORC survey found that while older Americans’ confidence in being financially prepared to pay for long-term care services remains low overall, there has been a slight increase in public confidence over the past four years, consistent with other measures of consumer confidence post-recession, according to the Consumer Confidence Index. In 2013, 27 percent reported feeling very or extremely confident in their ability to pay for long-term care, increasing to 29 percent in 2014, 32 percent in 2015, and 36 percent in 2016.

The polling finds reveal that a widespread misconception as to what Medicare covers for long-term care services. Older respondents, with an annual household incomes less than $50,000, are more likely to expect to rely on government programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, while those with higher incomes expect to rely more on personal savings to pay for their needed long-term care services. Still, 3 in 10 of these wealthier older Americans report that they will rely on Medicare to support their care as they age. This reflects common misperceptions among older Americans about the long-term care services that Medicare covers, notes the AP-NORC survey.

Thumbs Up to Aging in Place

Seventy seven percent of the survey respondents would prefer to “age in place” and receive care in their own home, w with far fewer preferring to receive care in a senior community (11 percent), a friend or family member’s home (4 percent), or a nursing home (4 percent). Among those respondents who prefer to receive care at home, there are gender differences in preferences for who provides that care: men would prefer to receive care from a spouse (51 percent vs. 33 percent), and women would prefer to receive care from their children (14 percent vs. 35 percent).

There is widespread support for policies to help caregivers face the costs of providing long-term care, with 72 percent supporting state programs to provide paid family leave, 83 percent supporting tax breaks for caregivers, and 73 percent supporting a Social Security earnings credit for caregivers taking time out from the workforce to provide care.

According to the AP-NORC survey, forty-three percent of the survey respondents have either been caregivers in the past or currently providing long-term care to a family member or close friend. Among those with experience as caregivers, 4 in 10 report having to miss work to provide care.

The researchers found that prior experience with long-term care is associated with greater support for several public policies to help people finance long-term care and to help alleviate costs for caregivers. These individuals expressed higher levels of concern about aging and are more likely to anticipate that it is at least somewhat likely that a loved one will need care in the next five years, compared to those without direct care giving experience.

Finally, one-third of the survey respondents reported having done no planning at all for their own long-term care needs. This 2016 finding is similar to the 31 percent who said the same in 2015 and remains lower than the 47 percent and 44 percent who said they had done no planning in 2014 and 2013, respectively.
One Size Does Not Fit All

Meghan Connelly, Chief Program Development at Rhode Island’s Division of Elderly Affairs, provides some thoughts about the findings of the AP-NORC survey. “Long-term care options are not “one-size-fits-all”. In Rhode Island, there are a number of choices one can make, ranging from living independently and receiving care at home to nursing home care. This report highlights that consumers want options when it comes to making these decisions for themselves, or assisting loved ones with long term care choices,” she says…

Connelly adds, the AP-NORC survey “supports the findings of past research: that the overwhelming majority of people want to receive long term care services at home,” noting that in the Ocean State there are many home- and community-based care options. She says that”home care may be available through a physician’s office; at the time of discharge from a hospital or nursing home; or through referrals to state-subsidized programs administered by agencies under the Executive Office of Health and Human Services.”

“The AP-NORC survey also underscores the need to adopt progressive financial policies that support family caregivers who provide the greatest percentage of needed long term care to their elderly or disabled loved ones at home,” warns Connelly.

Greg Crist, Senior Vice President of Public Affairs at the Washington, D.C.-based American Health Care Association (AHCA), notes, “This data generally tracks what our own research has shown: Americans don’t think of this topic every day, and honestly, this is a topic they’d rather avoid. No one likes the thought of aging, and with that aging, the increasing likelihood they will help in their later years. No one welcomes a loss of independence. But here’s the good news – the sector is adapting and innovating.”

Crist asserts nursing homes are meeting the challenge of caring for aging baby boomers. “We’re meeting the growing demands of Boomers, particularly as clinical needs grow, but also in offering amenities such as custom dietary menus, social media communities, and personal rehab care plans that speed recovery times. Whether in Rhode Island or elsewhere, this is an evolving health practice, recognizing that change is needed to meet the new preferences of older Americans,” notes Crist.

Listen to the Older Voters

The AP-NORC survey findings mirror other “long-term care perception” studies released by AHCA and AARP. Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and GOP standard bearer Donald Trump must not forget the needs of America’s exponentially growing older population. These older voters do not want to fall through the nation’s public policy safety net when they require the most assistance, paying for costly long-term care services. As the survey report notes, older Americans strongly support Family Leave programs and also call for government administered Long Term Care Insurance programs.

For a copy of the report go to http://www.longtermcarepoll.org/Pages/Polls/long-term-care-in-america-expectations-and-preferences-for-care-and-caregiving.aspx..

New Uniform Act Good News for Rhode Island Caregivers

Published in Woonsocket Call on November 29, 2015

With the quick stroke of her pen, Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo signed guardianship legislation into law during the 2015 legislative session that would help Rhode Islanders avoid costly and time-consuming red tape when exercising health care, financial and other legal responsibilities for their out-of-state, elderly loved ones. It takes effect on January 1, 2016.

Like motherhood and apple pie, the changes made to the State’s guardianship law had broad bipartisan support in the Rhode Island General Assembly. The House bill and a similar Senate companion measure (entitled the “Uniform Adult Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Jurisdiction Act”) passed overwhelming by votes of 72-2 and 37 to 1, respectively.

Representative Robert E. Craven (D-North Kingstown) who Chairs the House Committee on Municipal Government, says his legislation (introduced with Representative Michael A. Morin (D-Woonsocket) simply helps to protect those who are unable to protect themselves.  “When appointing guardians and instituting protective orders for adults, the law must be clear and concise to ensure someone’s rights are not violated while also keeping them safe,” he says, noting that the new law makes the rules and procedures very clear for this process and it will offer both the protected persons and petitioning guardians the legal causes and safeguards that are needed in such complex situation,” he said.

Fixes Jurisdictional Issues over Guardianship

According to Division of Elderly Affairs Director Charles J. Fogarty, the new law “provides consistency, reciprocity, and procedural efficiency in the best interest of seniors, creating a hospitable and healthy Rhode Island for our elders.”

Fogarty says that the new law would benefit caregivers in many way.  It clarifies state jurisdiction issues and even facilitates the transfer of guardianship from one state or another.  It also would enhance interstate recognition and enforcement of guardianship orders and simplifies communication and cooperation between courts.

Fogarty notes that Rhode Island’s new guardianship law is a law that 37 other states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have already enacted, allowing for cooperation on and simplification of inter-state issues.  “It will be easier for out-of-state caregivers to focus on supporting their loved ones as opposed to becoming mired in current laws.  This legislation ensures that seniors and caregivers don’t waste time and resources in cases involving simultaneous and conflicting jurisdiction,” he says.

“We are very pleased that our staff, our terrific State House advocacy volunteers and a strong network of partners worked hard together to ensure that Rhode Island became the 42nd jurisdiction to enact the Uniform Adult Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Jurisdiction Act,” said AARP State Director Kathleen Connell. “Now, Rhode Island joins the national effort that focuses on care, not courts, by removing the barriers that prevent caregivers from providing for their loved ones, regardless of where they live.”

According to the AARP Public Policy Institute’s recent report “Valuing the Invaluable: 2015 Update,” the number of caregivers in our state is 134,000. Their work has an economic value of $1.78 million. That, Connell said, is why AARP Rhode Island strongly supported the legislation and was joined by judges, lawyers and families throughout Rhode Island.

Many Benefits, No Cost to Rhode Island Taxpayers

Connell notes that when the uniform guardianship jurisdiction becomes law, it will carry no cost to taxpayers and makes no changes in the state’s substantive guardianship procedures. However, Rhode Islanders will benefit as it will save them time and money. In addition, they will be safeguarding the health and financial well-being of their loved ones.

“It may seem very technical,” Connell continued. “But the bottom line is easy to understand:  We all recognize that we are a mobile society, and with that we need laws pertaining to caregivers and their families to reflect that reality. AARP strongly supports legislation that removes barriers that prevent guardians in Rhode Island from providing for their loved ones, regardless of where they live. “For Rhode Islanders, the uniform guardianship act is a step in the right direction to help protect the interests of vulnerable incapacitated adults who need guardians,” Connell said. “With this law, our guardianship system will function more efficiently, fairly, and cost-effectively.”

Court-appointed guardians step into the shoes of at-risk adults who can no longer make their own decisions, and make judgments about property, medical care, living arrangements, lifestyle and potentially all personal and financial issues. As a judicial proceeding, guardianship can be expensive, time-consuming and combative. It can remove fundamental individual rights. It can prevent or redress elder abuse – or can create an opportunity for exploitation or abuse of vulnerable adults.

This new uniform act addresses initial jurisdiction regarding a guardianship case; recognition of one state’s guardianship orders by another; and interstate transfers of guardianship cases when such transfers would benefit the incapacitated person.

Another key reason AARP strongly supported enactment stems from concern over elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. It will reduce the enticement of a vulnerable person to another state ― to gain control over assets. The law now will permit a court to consider which jurisdiction can best protect a person subject to abuse, and facilitate communication between courts in different jurisdictions about allegations of abuse.

Partners included the Uniform Law Commission. The Commission provides states with non-partisan, well-conceived, and well drafted legislation that brings clarity and stability to critical areas of state statutory law. In addition, the Act has a broad range of support from organizations including the National College of Probate Judges, National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, National Guardianship Association, Conference of Chief Justices and the Alzheimer’s Association.

With the graying of Rhode Island’s population commonsense laws like the “Uniform Adult Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Jurisdiction Act” need to be enacted.  Last session, state lawmakers worked together to pass this legislation that makes guardianship system more efficient, less time-consuming and costly for Rhode Island caregivers.  At no cost to Ocean State taxpayers.  Hopefully, best policy practices from across the nation can be brought to the Rhode General Assembly for full consideration.  If it happened once it might just happen again.

 

Rhode Island General Assembly Seeks to Assist State’s Caregivers

Published in Woonsocket Call on June 14, 2015

With the graying of America’s population, the profile of the typical family caregiver has changed, says a new report released by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. The findings trouble aging advocates who warn that as care givers age they require more long term care support and community based care services.

Taking a Look at Today’s Caregiver

The report, “Caregiving in the United States 2015,” tells us that the “typical” family caregiver is a 49-year-old woman who takes care of a relative, caregivers on the whole are becoming as diverse as America’s population.

According to the 81 page report, today’s family caregiver also provides unpaid care for at least 21 hours a week, and has been care giving for an average of 5-1/2 years.  These individuals expect to continue providing care to their loved ones for another 5 years. Nearly half of these higher-hour caregivers report high emotional stress (46 percent), too.

Men, often stereotyped as failing to take on caregiving responsibilities, currently represent a whopping 40 percent of family caregivers, also providing an average of 23 hours a week being a caregiver to their loved ones, adds the report.

The study’s data indicates that today nearly a quarter of the nation’s caregivers are millennials between the ages of 18 and 34 and they are equally likely to be male or female. On the other end of the spectrum, 75 and older caregivers are typically the sole support for their loved one, providing care without paid help or assistance from relatives and friends.

Meanwhile, caregivers, with an average household income of $45,700, tell the researchers that they are not only emotionally strained, but financial strained as well. These higher-hour older caregivers report difficulty in finding affordable care giving services, such as delivered meals, transportation, or in-home health services, in their community, for themselves and their loved ones.

The report also notes that “Caregivers of a close relative—like a spouse or a parent—who are likely to provide care for 21 hours or more, indicate that being noted as a family caregiver in the medical records of the care recipient would be helpful in managing their caregiving responsibilities.”

Finally, the study’s findings indicate that caregivers who live more than an hour away from their care recipient also report higher levels of financial strain (21 percent), perhaps because 4 out of 10 long-distance caregivers report the use of paid help (41 percent).

Report Calls for Supporting Caregiver Needs

As previous AARP research has shown, we’re facing a caregiving cliff,” said Dr. Susan Reinhard, senior vice president and director, AARP Public Policy Institute; and chief strategist, Center to Champion Nursing in America. “By mid-century, there will be only three family caregivers available for each person requiring care. That means, to avoid putting them at higher risk as they age, we need to provide support for existing caregivers who are underserved by the current long-term services and support system.”

We’re especially concerned that not enough is being done to support family caregivers in the public or private sector as they age,” says Gail Gibson Hunt, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Caregiving. “There’s a double-edged sword when we fail to support caregivers, because we put both the caregiver and the care recipient at risk,” she warns.

Hunt observes, “Rhode Island is a unique state in that it has the highest percentage of persons over age 85. The data in this report speaks to some of the challenges of a graying population, particularly the needs of caregivers who are 75 or older.”

“We know from the data that the ‘typical’ caregiver over 75 is caring for a spouse or close relative, and spends about 34 hours a week providing care. This can be extremely challenging for an older person who may be managing their own mobility and health issues, as they help a loved one with basic needs like bathing or everyday tasks like grocery shopping,” said Hunt.

Hunt says, “Rhode Island has an opportunity to continue supporting older people and their caregivers, who are also growing older and need care.”

Lawmakers Posed to Pass Caregiver Law

           In June 4th, the Senate passed SB 481 A, the CARE (Caregiver Advise, Record  and Enable) Act, to provide caregivers with timely information to allow them to provide post-discharge care.  The House Chamber passed its measure, HB 6150 Sub A on June 10th.  Both chambers must now approve the legislation from the opposite chamber.  If passed, they go to the Governor for approval.  This legislation will be invaluable to the state’s 148,000 caregivers who provided 142 million hours of care for loved ones.

“We are delighted that – upon the CARE Act becoming law – Rhode Island will join seven other states that  have enacted CARE Act legislation, with bills in three other states awaiting their respective Governor’s signatures,” said AARP State Director Kathleen Connell.

“Together, AARP worked with a strong coalition of stakeholders, as well as the House and Senate sponsors, Representative Eileen Naughton, and Senator Gayle Goldin, and the members of the House’s Health, Education and Welfare Committee and the Senate’s Health and Human Services Committee,“ notes Connell.

“The passage of the CARE Act dovetails with the release of “Caregiving in the United States 2015,” which  presents a portrait of unpaid family caregivers today. It specifically addresses vulnerable groups of caregivers who face complex, high burden care situations. They tend to be older caregivers, who had no other option but to take on caregiving duties.” adds Connell.

Connell says, “It is sobering to conclude that in Rhode Island, with its above-average older population, we risk seeing more and more of old sick people caring for older sicker people. Clearly, that’s not a good thing and it needs addressing sooner than later.”

“One thing we noticed as the CARE Act made its way through the General Assembly was that a number of lawmakers shared their own personal caregiving stories. Some issues are harder to personally identify with than others, but when it comes to caregiving, it’s good to know we have this kind of attention. The report adds data and statistics that should help frame solutions,” says Connell.

 

Director Charles Fogarty, who oversees the state’s Division of Elderly Affairs (DEA), sees the value of AARP’s report highlighting the “critical role” of caregivers taking care of their loved one.  “Family support is essential to allow seniors to stay in their own homes and live as independently as possible, he says, noting that federal funds allows DEA to administer respite and care giver support programs.

“As the baby boomer generation ages, DEA will continue to seek out resources that provide support to family members who care for their loved one,” says Fogarty.

The CARE Act can provide assistance to those tirelessly care for their aged or disabled loved ones.   Kudos for the Rhode Island General Assembly giving them the tools to do a better job.

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12 is a Pawtucket-based writer covering aging, health care and medical issues.  He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.

 

Report: Hiring Older Workers Makes Good Business Sense

Published in Woonsocket Call on May 3, 2015

Here’s a sound strategy for America’s CEOs to follow to improve their corporation’s bottom line. AARP’s recently released study suggests, just hire or retain older workers.

An AARP study, released on April 27, discredits widespread myths and misconceptions about age 50+ employees, showing that they have skills and abilities that can make them key to operating a successful business. The report, “A Business Case for Workers Age 50+: A Look at the Value of Experience 2015,” says that the argument for employing older employees has grown even stronger during the last decade, reinforcing a 2005 AARP study that found that these experienced workers are highly motivated, productive and even cost-effective.

Researchers claim that this study documents for the “first time why attracting and retaining experienced age 50+ workers is critical for businesses seeking an advantage in the labor market.”

Older Workers Sound Investment

“Leading employers across all industries value the expertise and experience of workers 50+ and know that recruiting, retaining and engaging them will improve their business results,” said AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins in her statement on the releasing the 92 page report.

Just as today’s 50+ population is disrupting aging and eroding negative stereotypes, today’s 50+ workforce is adding value by exhibiting traits that are highly sought after in today’s economy,” Jenkins added.

Adds Roselyn Feinsod, senior partner at Aon Hewitt, a multinational company providing human resources, retirement and health solutions, that prepared this report, “Workers age 50+ are highly valuable within many organizations – particularly in those industries that require highly skilled workers or workers with unique skill sets, such as health care or energy.”

Researchers say that the AARP report comes at a time when experienced workers are playing an increasing role in America’s workplace. In 2002, workers age 50+ made up only 24.6 percent of the workforce. By 2012, they were 32.3 percent. By 2022, they are projected to represent 35.4 percent of the nation’s total workforce.

The AARP new study addresses a widespread misconception that older workers cost “significantly more” than younger workers. In fact, adding more talented older employees to your workforce can result in only minimal labor cost increases, says the researchers, noting that 90 percent of large employers now base pay in part on job performance, rather than exclusively on length of employment.

In addition, in terms of retirement costs, only 22 percent of large companies now offer a defined benefit pension plan, down significantly from the 68 percent in 2004.
Looking at the 50+ segment of the workforce from a performance standpoint, AARP and Aon Hewitt say that older workers remain the most engaged age group. The study reports that 65 percent of workers age 55+ are considered “engaged”, based on survey data, while younger employee engagement averages 58 to 60 percent.

Although the generational differences in engagement might not seem large, “it takes only a five percent increase in engagement to achieve three percent incremental revenue growth,” the report finds. This can translate into a large company with $5 billion in revenue achieving a $150 million revenue increase as a result of even a five percent engagement improvement, the study says.

The report concludes “An engaged older workforce can influence and enhance organizational productivity and generate improved business outcomes.” Other advantages of older workers include their job experience, professionalism, strong work ethic, lower turnover, and knowledge.
AARP commissioned the study to assess the advantages of both retaining and attracting older workers. The analysis relies primarily on data from Aon Hewitt databases, an extensive literature review and interviews with 18 large employers to obtain anecdotal information on how they approach older workers.

Contributing to Rhode Island’s Economy

“We have noted in the past the relevance of Rhode Island’s so-called Longevity Economy,” said AARP Rhode Island State Director Kathleen Connell. “Despite being just 36% of Rhode Island’s population in 2013 (expected to grow to 38% by 2040), the total economic contribution of the state’s 50-plus population accounted for 46% of Rhode Island’s GDP ($24 billion). Now we see another reason to embrace the older population.

Connell notes that “This new report reinforces the value of older Rhode Islanders as they continue to be a key asset in the workforce. It is especially good to have reliable data that exposes the false concept that older workers cost significantly more than younger workers. The truth is, that older workers increase labor costs minimally while contributing experience and stability to businesses across the spectrum.

“Many employers in Rhode Island understand this. AARP Rhode Island gets frequent calls from business actively seeking older workers. They know the value and the wisdom they bring to the workplace,” says Connell.

According to Charles Fogarty, Director of the Division of Elderly Affairs (DEA), the recently released AARP study helps his agency spread this message, “older workers are expected to play a key role in sparking Rhode Island’s comeback.”

“We support policies and programs to help this crucial segment remain active in the labor force by connecting older workers to services and training,” says Fogarty, noting that AARP’s study confirms, “our seniors are a valuable asset in our workforce given their wealth of knowledge, ability to mentor younger colleagues, and commitment to hard work.”

Deputy Director Lisa D’Agostino, of the state’s Department of Labor and Training agrees with DEA’s Fogarty. “Age 50+ workers are a talented segment of our workforce that is often overlooked and untapped when businesses seek workforce solutions. Given today’s demand for a skilled workforce the solution is simple – mature workers can bring the talent, leadership and work ethic employers need,” she says, noting that labor force participation for this group is on the rise and unemployment rates are lower than that of the prime working age population and have been for the last ten years.

Oak Hill resident Hank Rosenthal, 64, confirms the importance and value of hiring older workers. But, during his two-year job search, after being laid off, he experienced job discrimination, he claims. “Having been interviewed by numerous Human Resource professionals, they just seem incapable of understanding that the years of experience someone has gained is an asset. They seem unable to appreciate that knowledge, experience, and even skills acquired over a lifetime can be transferred and used in virtually any organization or business,” he says.

Rosenthal, now gainfully employed, views his older contemporaries as being “more stable, reliable, have better work ethics and generally make great employees, in line with the observations of the AARP report. With the difficulty in finding employment he believes that companies have not figured this out yet. “What a terrible waste of human capital,” he says.

While older workers may be forced to continuing working to pay their bills, many employees will take jobs for both psychological and social fulfillment. Hiring and retaining older workers may be a simple way for American businesses to maintain their competitiveness in a world economy. The report says that this can easily be accomplished by having “flexible workplaces, options for transitioning to retirement and fostering generational diversity and inclusion.” The AARP report is a must read for any CEO or Human Resource Director.

For the full report, go to http://www.aarp.org/research/topics/economics/info-2015/business-case-older-workers.html.

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12, is a Pawtucket-based writer who covers aging, health care and medical issues. He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.

Financial Exploitation of Elderly Must Be Addressed

Published in Pawtucket Times, February 7, 2015

 Professor Philip Marshall, Coordinator of the Historic Preservation Program at Roger Williams University in Bristol, entered Room 562 in the Dirkson Senate Building not to testify on historic preservation policy, as he often did, but to share a family tragedy.  Marshall’s testimony detailed how his grandmother, New York philanthropist Brooke Astor, was financially exploited in her later years by his father.

Brooke Astor, a philanthropist, socialite and writer, was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton in 1998, for her generous giving of millions of dollars to social and cultural cause.  Marshall, one of four witnesses who came before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging this past Wednesday, would say, that his 105 year old grandmother, who died on August 13, 2007, was considered to be “New York’s First Lady,” and a “humanist aristocrat with a generous heart.”

Marshall, a resident of South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, told the panel his mother would never have wanted to be known as “one of America’s most famous cases of elder abuse.”

“Nor did she, while in the throes of dementia, choose to be victimized to be deprived, manipulated and robbed – all as a calculated ‘scheme to defraud,’ as later characterized by the Manhattan District Attorney,” said Dr. Marshall.

Astor’s financial exploitation “may be her greatest, most lasting legacy,” says  Marshall.

In his testimony, Marshall told the attending Senators that after a three-month battle for guardianship to protect his grandmother’s assets, a settlement was reached five days before the court date.  A criminal investigation launched by the Manhattan District Attorney after a potential forgery was referred to his Elder Abuse Unit, would later lead to the indictment in 2007 of his father and a lawyer, says Marshall.

Two years later, after a six-month criminal trial the jury would find Marshall’s father guilty on 13 of 14 counts against him.  All, but one, were held up on appeal.

“While my grandmother’s stolen assets were reclaimed, many elders never reclaim their money – or their lives,” observes Marshall.  “Here, for financial transactions, enhanced detection, mandatory reporting, and greater reporting of suspicious activity will help,” he says.

A Growing Epidemic

 In her opening statement, Senator Susan M. Collins, (R-Maine) who chaired, the Senate Aging Panel’s hearing, “Broken Trust: Combating Financial Exploitation Targeting Vulnerable Seniors,” warns that a growing epidemic of financial exploitation is happening – one that she estimates to cost seniors an estimated $2.9 billion in 2010, according to the Government Accounting Office.

Financial exploitation is a growing problem in Rhode Island, too, notes Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), a member of the Senate Aging Panel. “Sadly, this number likely underestimates the cost to victims because older adults often do not report abuse, particularly when it involves a family member.”

Senator Whitehouse noted that this week’s Special Committee on Aging hearing examined the challenges to identifying and prosecuting fraud schemes and highlighted strategies to prevent the financial exploitation of seniors. “There are steps we can take to address this problem, and I strongly support the Older Americans Act, which recently advanced out of the HELP Committee and addresses financial exploitation and other forms of elder abuse,” he added.

“Over the past several years the Rhode Island State Police has experienced a steady increase in the number of complaints of elderly exploitation and larceny from individuals over sixty-five-years, says Colonel Steven O’Donnell, who oversees the Rhode Island State Police.  During the past six years his Agency has investigated 40 complaints amounting to a total loss to victims of over $1,000,000.00.

According to O’Donnell, in 2010, State Police investigated four complaints related to elderly exploitation and/or larceny.  Four years later, 14 complaints were investigated. “These increases may be attributed to the increased computer literacy of willing perpetrators and the increased accessibility to bank accounts online, which provides perpetrators the opportunity to conduct their criminal activity behind closed doors,” he says.

Combating Financial Exploitation

To ratchet up the protection of older Rhode Islanders against financial exploitation, Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin and the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a bill last year that extends the statute of limitations for elder exploitation from three years to ten years. Kilmartin says the new law, sponsored by retired Representative Elaine A. Coderre (D-District 60, Pawtucket) and Senator Paul V. Jabour (D- District 5, Providence), gives law enforcement officials the necessary time to build a proper case for charging and subsequent prosecution, bringing it in line with other financial crimes.

“The law about financial exploitation is on the books—let’s enforce it,” says, Kathleen Heren, State Long Term Care Ombudsman, at the Warwick-based Alliance for Better Long Term Care. “What a sad world we are in where a senior or a disabled person loses everything they have scrimped and saved for to a greedy individual who, in the majority of cases, is a family member,” she adds.  Over the years she has also seen financial exploitation involving clergy, lawyers, bank tellers, brokers, and “people who you would never suspect would steal from a frail elder.”

“Many people who hear “elder abuse and neglect” [or financial exploitation] think about older people living in nursing homes or about elderly relatives who live all alone and never have visitors. But elder abuse and financial exploitation are not just problems of older people we never see. It is right in our midst, and as Attorney General, I am committed to doing all I can to protect all of the citizens of our state,” says Kilmartin.

“Many elders rely on others for assistance, but oftentimes think they can easily trust these helpers to handle their financial affairs, only to be robbed of their hard earned money,” says Kilmartin, noting that in some cases the perpetrator leaves the victim penniless.

Kilmartin notes that financial exploitation of elders is one of the most challenging crimes to investigate, charge and prosecute.  By the time law enforcement becomes aware of the abuse and investigates the matter, the statute of limitations has often expired.  “The statute of limitations needs to be more reasonable so these complicated cases can be prosecuted appropriately,” states Rhode Island’s Attorney General. “Seniors, especially those who must rely on others for care, were unnecessarily made more vulnerable by the previous short statute of limitations,” he says.

According to Kilmartin, The Office of Attorney General has a specialized unit of prosecutors and investigators that handle elder abuse cases.  Several years ago, the Elder Abuse Unit was created because of the large percentage of Rhode Islanders who were age 60 and over. The special needs of the older victims and the fact that elder abuse, neglect and exploitation crosses all racial, socio-economic, gender and geographic lines made the need for a special unit apparent.  Coupled with this fact that this age group is the State’s fastest growing demographic, crimes against older persons often times go unreported, presenting high temptation and low risk for prosecution.

In Rhode Island, there is a mandatory duty of all citizens to report a suspicion of elder abuse and/or elder financial exploitation. To report elder physical abuse and/or elder financial abuse, contact your local police, Rhode Island State Police or the Rhode Island Division of Elderly Affairs at (401) 462-3000 or dea.ri.gov.

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12 is a Pawtucket writer covering aging, health care and medical issues.  He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com or at 401 742-4372.